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Lahiri. Interpreter of Maladies

Ranking66inBelletristik
PaperbackPaperback
English
CHF17.80
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Product

Cover TextA scintillating collection of short stories, each a study of yearning and exile among Boston's Indian community. The first UK edition of a debut collection that did well in the States and is part of Harper Collins' Indian Summer promotion. "One of the finest short story writers I have ever read" Amy Tan.
SummaryPulitzer-winning, scintillating studies in yearning and exile from a Bengali Bostonian woman of immense promise. A couple exchange unprecedented confessions during nightly blackouts in their Boston apartment as they struggle to cope with a heartbreaking loss; a student arrives in new lodgings in a mystifying new land and, while he awaits the arrival of his arranged-marriage wife from Bengal, he finds his first bearings with the aid of the curious evening rituals that his centenarian landlady orchestrates; a schoolboy looks on while his childminder finds that the smallest dislocation can unbalance her new American life all too easily and send her spiralling into nostalgia for her homeland...Jhumpa Lahiri's prose is beautifully measured, subtle and sober, and she is a writer who leaves a lot unsaid, but this work is rich in observational detail, evocative of the yearnings of the exile (mostly Indians in Boston here), and full of emotional pull and reverberation.
Details
ISBN/GTIN978-0-00-655179-9
Product TypePaperback
BindingPaperback
Publishing year2000
Publishing date15/05/2000
LanguageEnglish
Weight151 g
Article no.1324598
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Content/Review

Critique'Lahiri has an extraordinary voice' Salman Rushdie 'Jhumpa Lahiri is the kind of writer who makes you want to grab the next person you see and say "Read this!" She's a dazzling storyteller with a distinctive voice, an eye for nuance, an ear for irony. She is one of the finest short story writers I've read.' AMY TAN 'Jhumpa Lahiri's strong, subtle short story collection is a debut to relish.' Guardian